August122011
Spices reduce insulin and triglyceride response. So what on earth does that mean?
Well, after a big meal, insulin is released in response to high blood sugar, triggering fat storage. Also, after that same big meal, triglycerides (or fat molecules) circulate throughout the bloodstream, making the blood thicker and blood pressure higher.
So, clearly it’s better to have lower insulin and triglyceride responses. New research has shown that adding large quantities of spices (about 2 tablespoons in total) reduces insulin response by 20 percent and triglyceride response by 30 percent compared to the same meal without spices added. Also, antioxidant activity increases by about 13 percent.
So, next time your seasoning up a meal, go a little heavy-handed on the spices. You’ll be better off.

Spices reduce insulin and triglyceride response. So what on earth does that mean?

Well, after a big meal, insulin is released in response to high blood sugar, triggering fat storage. Also, after that same big meal, triglycerides (or fat molecules) circulate throughout the bloodstream, making the blood thicker and blood pressure higher.

So, clearly it’s better to have lower insulin and triglyceride responses. New research has shown that adding large quantities of spices (about 2 tablespoons in total) reduces insulin response by 20 percent and triglyceride response by 30 percent compared to the same meal without spices added. Also, antioxidant activity increases by about 13 percent.

So, next time your seasoning up a meal, go a little heavy-handed on the spices. You’ll be better off.

July72011

More Veggies= Longer Life

Big shocker here, right?

A recent study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed a link between higher consumption of fruits and vegetables and a 15% reduction in death throughout the duration of the study.

This results imply what we’ve all known for a while- fruits and veggies benefit our health and reduce risk of death and chronic diseases.

Still, the results may have been modified slightly by extraneous variables. Those who tend to eat more fruits and vegetables also tend to live healthier lives in many other ways, which could skew the results a bit.

However, it continues to be a good idea, from when Mama told you to eat your carrots through adulthood, to eat more fruits and vegetables for better health.

-Kevan Mellendick, MS Dietetics ‘11

3PM

This video provides a short, sweet, and accurate way to understand what registered dietitian is as opposed to a nutritionist.

To elaborate, a registered dietitian, or RD, must complete at least an approved undergrad dietetics program plus an approved internship program to even sit for the registration exam. After passing the exam, then one can be called an RD.

Nutritionists can vary from a mail-order degree to a PhD based on their scope of practice. More often than not, a nutritionist has either a high school diploma with some sort of certification course completed or a bachelor’s degree in nutrition. PhD nutritionists are typically embedded in some type of advanced research on human metabolism or toxicology.

As a rule, the most accurate, up-to-date, and practical advice about nutrition will come from an RD. Still, as stated in the video, it is likely most important to identify the qualifications of the nutritionist/dietician, their continuing education, and their most recent positions to gauge their quality as a nutrition professional.

Hope this might clear up a little bit about my beloved field.

-Kevan Mellendick, MS Dietetics ‘11

P.S. I am finishing my internship in December, along with my Master’s in Dietetics, and I’d be happy to share any of my continuing education.

June102011
So, everybody knows it’s pretty damn hot in Texas. And that heat really gets to ya…fast.
In that vein, I’ve got a few tips to help beat the summer heat, especially as we approach July and 110+.
There are 3 basic things to do to keep your energy level at optimal: good nutrition, regular exercise, and quality sleep.
More specifically with nutrition, focus on 3 nutrients.
1. Vitamin B12- this vitamin is incredibly important in regulating the metabolism of food. So make sure you get enough B12 to keep your metabolism working well, and energy running continually. Find B12 in any animal product- beef, chicken, fish, milk, eggs. If you’re a vegetarian, you can also find some versions of soy or almond milk fortified with B12. But meat is really going to be the best source, with one serving (3 oz.) of beef bringing roughly a full day’s requirement of B12.
2. Protein- now I know I’m always breaching about protein, but it really is important. Protein is necessary to keep your muscles stable and strong. Plus, protein helps slow digestion, allowing a more continuous and sustained supply of energy. This will keep your blood sugar in the appropriate range for sustained energy.
3. Fiber- fiber takes a while to digest and slows down digestion of other carbohydrates. This is exactly why it’s important to maintain energy. So fiber helps keep your blood sugar level when eating high carbohydrate foods, allowing sustained energy, rather than a spike and drop.
Good luck in the heat guys and stay cool.
-Kevan Mellendick, MS Dietetics ‘11

So, everybody knows it’s pretty damn hot in Texas. And that heat really gets to ya…fast.

In that vein, I’ve got a few tips to help beat the summer heat, especially as we approach July and 110+.

There are 3 basic things to do to keep your energy level at optimal: good nutrition, regular exercise, and quality sleep.

More specifically with nutrition, focus on 3 nutrients.

1. Vitamin B12- this vitamin is incredibly important in regulating the metabolism of food. So make sure you get enough B12 to keep your metabolism working well, and energy running continually. Find B12 in any animal product- beef, chicken, fish, milk, eggs. If you’re a vegetarian, you can also find some versions of soy or almond milk fortified with B12. But meat is really going to be the best source, with one serving (3 oz.) of beef bringing roughly a full day’s requirement of B12.

2. Protein- now I know I’m always breaching about protein, but it really is important. Protein is necessary to keep your muscles stable and strong. Plus, protein helps slow digestion, allowing a more continuous and sustained supply of energy. This will keep your blood sugar in the appropriate range for sustained energy.

3. Fiber- fiber takes a while to digest and slows down digestion of other carbohydrates. This is exactly why it’s important to maintain energy. So fiber helps keep your blood sugar level when eating high carbohydrate foods, allowing sustained energy, rather than a spike and drop.

Good luck in the heat guys and stay cool.

-Kevan Mellendick, MS Dietetics ‘11

June42011

Special Tips for adding lean muscle in your workouts

So many people think that they must gain a lot of weight with lots of fat to gain muscle. This really isn’t necessarily true. Yes, in the end, you will gain some fat with the muscle tissue, but you can minimize this effect by timing foods properly, and avoiding certain types of foods throughout the rest of the day.

1. DO NOT EAT FAT BEFORE A WORKOUT- at least not much, especially when utilizing sports drinks or bars. Those sports drinks and bars have plenty of sugar, which spikes insulin, leading to fat storage. If you already have fat in your system, the blood sugar spike is more pronounced, and the sports drinks or bars won’t fuel your muscles as you intended. Plus, you’ll be more likely to store those foods as fat rather than burn those calories during your workout. Neither of these is good.

2. EASY-TO-DIGEST PROTEIN IS KEY- both before and after your workout, you need protein that is easy to digest to get to your muscles quickly and fuel the anabolic (this build-up) effect with minimal fat accompaniment. White fish is perfect before your workout (lower in fat than most meats), say an hour to two hours, followed by any form of whey after your workout. Whey can be found in basically any meat, including chicken, beef, pork, turkey, etc.

3. KEEP UP WITH PROTEIN THROUGHOUT THE DAY- you don’t need tons and tons like many bodybuilders would tell you, but small doses of protein regularly during the day is important to prevent muscle breakdown. This means you need protein at breakfast, lunch, dinner, and preferably with snacks. So try to incorporate various high protein foods in each meal, like meat, fish, beans, nuts, and dairy. Dairy protein can be especially useful because casein, making up about 80% of the protein in milk, takes longer to digest. This allows a more continuous feed of protein throughout the day. But, this also makes dairy a bad idea shortly before a workout.

4. CUT BACK ON SUGARY FOODS- very sugary foods should be enjoyed very sparingly when looking to add lean muscle. They spike blood sugar almost immediately, and very quickly promote fat storage. However, this effect can be mitigated if eating these foods at the end of a high-fiber, high-protein meal. So, cut back on the sugary foods, but if you want to eat them, it’s a good idea to incorporate them into a meal or as a dessert only. This also means that fruit juice should be avoided, and fruit should be eaten throughout the day or with meals, rather than large quantities in one sitting.

5. LOW FAT CHOCOLATE MILK- this is nature’s best sports drink. New studies have added to previous evidence that the combination of sugars, proteins, and sparse fat improve performance, stamina, and longevity in a workout. So, if you want to pack on the muscle, increase performance with 1% chocolate milk (and some water) as your sports drink, rather than drinks with nothing but sugar and salt.

Hope this comes in time for summer beach season.

-Kevan Mellendick, MS Dietetics ‘11

April242011
FINALS TIME
So here’s a little list of great stress-fighting foods for finals time, that are actually good for you.
Before I lay out the list, I must tell you a little about the havoc major stress can play on your body. Stress increases levels of cortisol, a hormone that stimulates appetite and fat storage. Also, stress increases the levels of free radicals circulating throughout the body, which can cause damage to blood vessels, organ tissues, and even DNA. The foods that follow will be lower calorie and/or higher antioxidant (compounds that counteract free radicals) than many classic comfort foods.
1. Red Grapes- high in fiber and containing tons of antioxidants, this is a great cheap source of something sweet to keep you going.
2. Dark Chocolate- we’re talkin about really dark stuff, 70% or more cacao. This chocolate has a much higher concentration of antioxidants and much less sugar. So get your chocolate fix with a better for you variety.
3. Milk- (preferably low or nonfat) the protein will fill you up and the simple sugars will fuel you as well. Plus the B12 will give a little boost to your metabolism, and studies have shown that milk actually wakes you up.
4. Beef- kind of a shocker, right? Actually lean beef is a great choice- it has plenty of Zinc that is extremely important and underrated in aiding the immune system. So grab some lean beef, like a good steak, not a burger, and protect your immunity (stress places extra strain on the immune system to fend off infection).
5. Fortified Breakfast Cereals- fortified means they add vitamins and minerals, so naturally this will have good antioxidants like vitamins A, C, and E. Plus its easy and goes great with our number 3 food. But be mindful of the super sugary cereal like froot loops, chocolate whatever, or cookie crisp (if it has cookie in the name, it’s not very healthful).
6. Tea- tea has lots of great antioxidants and, unless you add lots of cream and/or sugar, has very few calories. Plus a little caffeine to keep you going, this is a great drink choice.
7. Blueberries- another power fruit, blueberries actually have even higher rates of antioxidants than other food on the list. However, they are a bit more expensive, especially out of season. My suggestion- grab some frozen, they are much cheaper and are a great choice for dessert even still frozen.

Good luck with finals all.
-Kevan Mellendick, MS Dietetics ‘11

FINALS TIME

So here’s a little list of great stress-fighting foods for finals time, that are actually good for you.

Before I lay out the list, I must tell you a little about the havoc major stress can play on your body. Stress increases levels of cortisol, a hormone that stimulates appetite and fat storage. Also, stress increases the levels of free radicals circulating throughout the body, which can cause damage to blood vessels, organ tissues, and even DNA. The foods that follow will be lower calorie and/or higher antioxidant (compounds that counteract free radicals) than many classic comfort foods.

1. Red Grapes- high in fiber and containing tons of antioxidants, this is a great cheap source of something sweet to keep you going.

2. Dark Chocolate- we’re talkin about really dark stuff, 70% or more cacao. This chocolate has a much higher concentration of antioxidants and much less sugar. So get your chocolate fix with a better for you variety.

3. Milk- (preferably low or nonfat) the protein will fill you up and the simple sugars will fuel you as well. Plus the B12 will give a little boost to your metabolism, and studies have shown that milk actually wakes you up.

4. Beef- kind of a shocker, right? Actually lean beef is a great choice- it has plenty of Zinc that is extremely important and underrated in aiding the immune system. So grab some lean beef, like a good steak, not a burger, and protect your immunity (stress places extra strain on the immune system to fend off infection).

5. Fortified Breakfast Cereals- fortified means they add vitamins and minerals, so naturally this will have good antioxidants like vitamins A, C, and E. Plus its easy and goes great with our number 3 food. But be mindful of the super sugary cereal like froot loops, chocolate whatever, or cookie crisp (if it has cookie in the name, it’s not very healthful).

6. Tea- tea has lots of great antioxidants and, unless you add lots of cream and/or sugar, has very few calories. Plus a little caffeine to keep you going, this is a great drink choice.

7. Blueberries- another power fruit, blueberries actually have even higher rates of antioxidants than other food on the list. However, they are a bit more expensive, especially out of season. My suggestion- grab some frozen, they are much cheaper and are a great choice for dessert even still frozen.

Good luck with finals all.

-Kevan Mellendick, MS Dietetics ‘11

10PM
Recovery drinks- which to choose, why, and how they work

OK, here’s the basic principle behind recovery from exercise:
First, exercise breaks down muscle fibers and uses up energy stores known as glycogen within muscle tissues.
Then, recovery involves replenishing what is broken down- the glucose that makes up glycogen, and the protein that makes up muscles.
Thus, in essence, most “recovery drinks,” bars or supplements that contain protein and sugar will in fact do the job. Still, there are some slight nuances to the various recovery drinks.
Mainly, you want a reasonable amount of sugar, not too much, but not too little. This is usually related to how intense the exercise is. Second, you want high quality protein- meaning that it contains all the amino acids necessary to survive. There are a few types of protein that fit the bill- casein and whey are the most well known. Any plant protein is not complete by itself, this includes soy. Another thing to consider is the quantity of protein- many have far too much. Nobody, for all intents and purposes, can digest and utilize more than 30 grams of protein in one sitting.
Therefore, an effective recovery drink will have between 20-30 grams of protein, preferably of whey or casein variety, and a moderate amount of simple sugar (probably between 30 and 50 grams).
However, some major recovery drinks have things that are unnecessary and potentially harmful. These include: high fat content, high cholesterol, high sodium, and unnecessarily large quantities of many vitamins and/or minerals. Also, some may contain large quantities of heavy metals- not to the point of hazard from one serving, but in fact hazardous at the level of as little as 3 servings a day.
So, when choosing a recovery drink made by a manufacturer, look at the nutrition label and research the product. On the label, look for little to no cholesterol or saturated fat, moderate sugar and protein, no vitamin or mineral with more than 100% daily value, and research proving little to no heavy metal contamination (this metals are Arsenic, Mercury and Cadmium).
Or, you can skip the manufactured stuff and go with normal, whole foods and get NATURE’S Recovery drink:
2% Chocolate Milk- it has the right complement of sugar, fat, and high quality protein to be very beneficial in recovery. You just may need to drink 2-4 cups depending on your size. Yogurt is also a very high quality recovery food. Or, of course, you could grab some fruit and eat some meat, cheese, or regular milk.
Hope this was informative- good workouts to all and drink your milk people!
-Kevan Mellendick, MS Dietetics ‘11

Recovery drinks- which to choose, why, and how they work

OK, here’s the basic principle behind recovery from exercise:

First, exercise breaks down muscle fibers and uses up energy stores known as glycogen within muscle tissues.

Then, recovery involves replenishing what is broken down- the glucose that makes up glycogen, and the protein that makes up muscles.

Thus, in essence, most “recovery drinks,” bars or supplements that contain protein and sugar will in fact do the job. Still, there are some slight nuances to the various recovery drinks.

Mainly, you want a reasonable amount of sugar, not too much, but not too little. This is usually related to how intense the exercise is. Second, you want high quality protein- meaning that it contains all the amino acids necessary to survive. There are a few types of protein that fit the bill- casein and whey are the most well known. Any plant protein is not complete by itself, this includes soy. Another thing to consider is the quantity of protein- many have far too much. Nobody, for all intents and purposes, can digest and utilize more than 30 grams of protein in one sitting.

Therefore, an effective recovery drink will have between 20-30 grams of protein, preferably of whey or casein variety, and a moderate amount of simple sugar (probably between 30 and 50 grams).

However, some major recovery drinks have things that are unnecessary and potentially harmful. These include: high fat content, high cholesterol, high sodium, and unnecessarily large quantities of many vitamins and/or minerals. Also, some may contain large quantities of heavy metals- not to the point of hazard from one serving, but in fact hazardous at the level of as little as 3 servings a day.

So, when choosing a recovery drink made by a manufacturer, look at the nutrition label and research the product. On the label, look for little to no cholesterol or saturated fat, moderate sugar and protein, no vitamin or mineral with more than 100% daily value, and research proving little to no heavy metal contamination (this metals are Arsenic, Mercury and Cadmium).

Or, you can skip the manufactured stuff and go with normal, whole foods and get NATURE’S Recovery drink:

2% Chocolate Milk- it has the right complement of sugar, fat, and high quality protein to be very beneficial in recovery. You just may need to drink 2-4 cups depending on your size. Yogurt is also a very high quality recovery food. Or, of course, you could grab some fruit and eat some meat, cheese, or regular milk.

Hope this was informative- good workouts to all and drink your milk people!

-Kevan Mellendick, MS Dietetics ‘11

March222011

Squats- A great but feared exercise

Squats work the whole legs, hamstrings, quads, adductors, calves and glutes. They build stronger knees, a stronger back and are quite possibly the best overall strength-building exercise there is. They are also one of the most unnecessarily feared excercises out there.

Many people are scared to death of the squat. There literally could be a gym disease called squataphobia because no matter what gym I’ve ever belonged to I have always found a number of people who just cringe at the thought of squatting.

Misinformation is pretty common. For the most part, people who fear squatting have either been misinformed by misinformed people, had a bad experience with squats, or are afraid of hard work. “Squats will ruin your knees,” “Squats will ruin your back,” “Squats are bad for you” and the like.

When performed correctly, squats do the exact opposite. Squats are rough. I will not hesitate to tell you that. They take ultimate mental and physical concentration. They are heavy, tedious and force you to push yourself to your absolute limits, and yes, very bad things can happen if you squat wrong. That’s why you should know how to squat correctly.

First of all, make sure you are using a sturdy squat rack. Always use collars on the barbell so as not to allow the weights to slide. Make sure you have a nice pad to put on the bar especially when the weight gets heavy, and never squat without a partner. When using very heavy weights you may even want two partners.

Get started by properly warming up. I usually do about five minutes on the exercise bike followed by five minutes of stretching. Then go to the squat rack and do a set using nothing but the weight of the bar. It helps if you can look in a mirror while you squat so you can check your form. Step under the bar, place your hands a little wider than shoulder width apart and rest the bar on your trapezius muscles. That is important. Never put the bar on your neck. The bar should rest about shoulder level across your traps. The traps can handle it, the neck can’t. Proceed to get ready to do your set. I keep my feet shoulder width and I don’t do any of that fancy toe pointing. I keep my toes pointed just slightly out. Now that you are in position, it’s time for the squat itself. Lower yourself slowly to a near sitting position. I do go below parallel, but I do not recommend it until you have reached an advanced level of training and can be shown by a trainer.

Your back should remain as straight as you can keep it (this will vary with the amount of weight you are shouldering). Do not lean forward. If you lean forward you are putting a great deal of strain on your back. Squats are an explosive movement so you don’t want to go up slowly like in most exercises. You want to explode upward. As important as it is to explode upward it is even more important to lower yourself slowly and in complete control. Going down too quickly and then using that momentum to bounce upward is what will cause knee injury. You should never, ever use ballistic shock to help propel the weight in squats.

As you squat, the calves help to stabilize your lower body while the abdominals and spinal erectors support the upper body. As you lower yourself the stress starts with the quads, shifts to the hamstrings and adductors as you go further down and then to the glutes. This process happens in reverse as you go up. Spend a good deal of time developing proper form and then begin adding on the weight. You will find that it does not take long to advance in the squat.

The squat is very intimidating and you need to realize that. Respect the weight. I’ve never needed a spotter to help me get the weight up, I find it vital to have someone to help me slide the weight back onto the rack safely when I am done doing my set however.

I myself do not use a weight belt. I find in too constricting, however, I would suggest it to most people. I also suggest squatting in sturdy high-top shoes to keep your ankles stable. I have never had a weight roll off my back. The only way that can happen is through carelessness. That is why you must always be completely focused while squatting. I have had the weight push me down onto the rack, but this isn’t really something to worry about. The squat rack keeps the weight from crushing you and will stop the weight at full squat level to the floor.

 Remember, do it right, do it safely, start out slowly and work your way up, and you will find squats to be one of the most rewarding exercises you can perform. The best advice I can give you is not to be afraid and not to listen to misinformation. Hard work always results in big gains.

March192011
How to Avoid Overindulging in the Times We Do So Most:
This is a short list of how to avoid the pitfalls of certain situations that lead many of us to pack on the pounds.
These are instances where many of us lose our willpower and go for large quantities of high calorie foods.
1. On Vacation
Most people throw caution to the wind when they go on vacation. My recommendation- eat whatever you want. Indulge. However, cut down the portions by sharing the experience with friends of family. Try the rich, chocolaty dessert, but split that slice with your significant other, for example.
2. Emotionally Stressful Times
After breaking up with someone, feeling sorrowful after a loss, or a litany of other trying times, many drown their sorrows in a sweet tooth or other high calorie foods. Many will also talk things over with friends at the bar. My suggestion- Work off that rage or sadness with some outdoor time and exercise. Hit the punching bag, shrug up some weights, or swim it off. Invite your friend for a run or a game of hoops to talk instead of a night of fried food and booze at the bar.
3. Parties with great-looking, but fatty food
We’ve all been there: you have a few drinks with friends over half a tray of dip and chips. To keep yourself from pigging out on those delectable, not filling, fatty foods at the party, my suggestion is to eat before hand. Have a large dinner or a small, high-protein snack that will keep you feeling full throughout the party and cut you back on the volume of junk eaten. It’s also good to cut back on the booze- if you’re tempted sober, chances are you’re acting on temptation drunk.
4. Watching TV
This is a big one. Almost everyone likes to kick back and snack mindlessly while watching their shows, movies, or sports. And, unfortunately, most commonly known and eaten snack foods are high in calories and empty in vitamins and minerals. So, my tip to satisfy the oral fixation of eating and watching TV: grab some fruit, either frozen or fresh, or some raw veggies with a yogurt dip, to replace those crunchy chips and crackers. Or, grab some lowfat frozen yogurt instead of that ice cream.
5. Buffets or restaurants with large portions
Here’s a huge pitfall for anyone who eats out often. At the buffet, you’re surrounded by food and expected to “eat your money’s worth.” At many restaurants, the plates are bigger than your head and full to the edge, and you simply eat everything on your plate just like your mom told you to when you were a kid. My tips: First, at the buffet, don’t sit facing the food- there seems to be something instinctual to seeing food and deciding to eat it. Second, load up on lean protein, fruits, and veggies with your first plate. The fiber and protein will make you feel full, and you choose the highest quality foods first, so you’re less likely to knock down too many fatty foods before giving up. Third, ask for a doggy bag at the restaurant right after the food is served. Then, leave what you realistically expect will fill you up on the plate, and the put the rest in the doggy bag (or split it up half and half). Then, if you get hungry later, you can eat your leftovers at home.
Hope this is helpful.
-Kevan Mellendick, MS Dietetics ‘11

How to Avoid Overindulging in the Times We Do So Most:

This is a short list of how to avoid the pitfalls of certain situations that lead many of us to pack on the pounds.

These are instances where many of us lose our willpower and go for large quantities of high calorie foods.

1. On Vacation

Most people throw caution to the wind when they go on vacation. My recommendation- eat whatever you want. Indulge. However, cut down the portions by sharing the experience with friends of family. Try the rich, chocolaty dessert, but split that slice with your significant other, for example.

2. Emotionally Stressful Times

After breaking up with someone, feeling sorrowful after a loss, or a litany of other trying times, many drown their sorrows in a sweet tooth or other high calorie foods. Many will also talk things over with friends at the bar. My suggestion- Work off that rage or sadness with some outdoor time and exercise. Hit the punching bag, shrug up some weights, or swim it off. Invite your friend for a run or a game of hoops to talk instead of a night of fried food and booze at the bar.

3. Parties with great-looking, but fatty food

We’ve all been there: you have a few drinks with friends over half a tray of dip and chips. To keep yourself from pigging out on those delectable, not filling, fatty foods at the party, my suggestion is to eat before hand. Have a large dinner or a small, high-protein snack that will keep you feeling full throughout the party and cut you back on the volume of junk eaten. It’s also good to cut back on the booze- if you’re tempted sober, chances are you’re acting on temptation drunk.

4. Watching TV

This is a big one. Almost everyone likes to kick back and snack mindlessly while watching their shows, movies, or sports. And, unfortunately, most commonly known and eaten snack foods are high in calories and empty in vitamins and minerals. So, my tip to satisfy the oral fixation of eating and watching TV: grab some fruit, either frozen or fresh, or some raw veggies with a yogurt dip, to replace those crunchy chips and crackers. Or, grab some lowfat frozen yogurt instead of that ice cream.

5. Buffets or restaurants with large portions

Here’s a huge pitfall for anyone who eats out often. At the buffet, you’re surrounded by food and expected to “eat your money’s worth.” At many restaurants, the plates are bigger than your head and full to the edge, and you simply eat everything on your plate just like your mom told you to when you were a kid. My tips: First, at the buffet, don’t sit facing the food- there seems to be something instinctual to seeing food and deciding to eat it. Second, load up on lean protein, fruits, and veggies with your first plate. The fiber and protein will make you feel full, and you choose the highest quality foods first, so you’re less likely to knock down too many fatty foods before giving up. Third, ask for a doggy bag at the restaurant right after the food is served. Then, leave what you realistically expect will fill you up on the plate, and the put the rest in the doggy bag (or split it up half and half). Then, if you get hungry later, you can eat your leftovers at home.

Hope this is helpful.

-Kevan Mellendick, MS Dietetics ‘11

9PM
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